2016 Subaru WRX STi Limited Radio Pin outs

I had a hard time finding this info, so I’m posting it here.

These are the three main connectors to the 7 inch NAV unit on a 2016 WRX STI Limited.

Here’s a doc related the the Harmon Kardon amp in the trunk AUDM Subaru WRX STI (2016) Premium with Harman Kardon package

 

XDA [How-To] Disable Forced Encryption

XDA [How-To] Disable Forced Encryption – Nexus 6

 

 

  • Extract the Android Image Kitchen zip Android_Image_Kitchen.zip
  • drag in the boot.img file you wish to modify onto the unpackimg.bat file
  • you should get a command window pop up, it should say succesfull and you will get a few folders added.
  • open the ramdisk folder and open the fstab.shamu file using notepad++
  • search for forceencrypt and replace it with encryptable. there should be only one case where this exists.
  • save the file, go back to the root of the image kitchen folder, and run the repackimg.bat file.
  • you should get a new boot.img build called image-new.img, you can use this now to flash on your device

 

 

Tell apt-get not to install “recommends” packages in Debian Linux

Tip: Tell apt-get not to install “recommends” packages in Debian Linux

Preview:

Purpose: If you are using Debian Lenny and are installing software packages using apt-get then you might have noticed the new version of apt-get in Lenny installs the “recommends” packages automatically thus increasing the number of packages installed on your computer. The “apt-get” in Debian Etch (4.0) did not use to install “recommends” packages.  In this post, we will see how we can permanently tell apt-get NOT to install “recommends” packages.  For those of you who are not sure about Debian’s “depends”, “recommends” and “suggested” packages, please refer to this doc. This is important if you have limited storage space on your system, say for example an embedded system.

Adjust Windows DNS settings from command line

If you ever wanted to change the DNS settings on Windows 7/8 here’s how you do it.

Open a command prompt with Administrator privileges, and type the following:

netsh interface ip set dns name="Wi-Fi" static 192.168.1.2

Secondary DNS:

netsh interface ip add dns name="Wi-Fi" 192.168.1.1index=2

If you want to change to use DHCP Server provided DNS do this:

netsh interface ip set dnsservers name="Wi-Fi" source=dhcp

Secure Erase SSD in Linux

Original Article: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/SSD_memory_cell_clearing

Step 1 – Make sure the drive security is not frozen

Issue the following command:

# hdparm -I /dev/sdX

Step 2 – Enable security by setting a user password

Note: When the user password is set the drive will be locked after next power cycle denying normal access until unlocked with the correct password.

Any password will do, as this should only be temporary. After the secure erase the password will be set back to NULL. In this example, the password is “PasSWorD” as shown:

# hdparm --user-master u --security-set-pass PasSWorD /dev/sdX
security_password="PasSWorD"
/dev/sdX:
Issuing SECURITY_SET_PASS command, password="PasSWorD", user=user, mode=high

As a sanity check, issue the following command

# hdparm -I /dev/sdX

The command output should display “enabled”:

Security: 
        Master password revision code = 65534
                supported
                enabled
        not     locked
        not     frozen
        not     expired: security count
                supported: enhanced erase
        Security level high
        2min for SECURITY ERASE UNIT. 2min for ENHANCED SECURITY ERASE UNIT.

Step 3 – Issue the ATA Secure Erase command

Warning: Triple check that the correct drive designation is used. There is no turning back once the command is confirmed. You have been warned.
# hdparm --user-master u --security-erase PasSWorD /dev/sdX

Wait until the command completes. This example output shows it took about 40 seconds for an Intel X25-M 80GB SSD.

security_password="PasSWorD"
/dev/sdX:
Issuing SECURITY_ERASE command, password="PasSWorD", user=user
0.000u 0.000s 0:39.71 0.0%      0+0k 0+0io 0pf+0w

The drive is now erased. After a successful erasure the drive security should automatically be set to disabled (thus no longer requiring a password for access). Verify this by running the following command:

# hdparm -I /dev/sdX

The command output should display “not enabled”:

Security: 
        Master password revision code = 65534
                supported
        not     enabled
        not     locked
        not     frozen
        not     expired: security count
                supported: enhanced erase
        2min for SECURITY ERASE UNIT. 2min for ENHANCED SECURITY ERASE UNIT.